A look at Apple's Material Recovery Lab, which houses Daisy, a robot that can disassemble 15 different iPhone models at a rate of 200/hour for parts recycling (Ian Sherr/CNET)

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Hidden not far from downtown Austin, Texas, a research lab is working to change the way we recycle electronics. And it’s being run by Apple.

If you don’t know exactly where it is, you’ll definitely miss it.

There are no signs. The parking lot is almost empty. There’s an unremarkable door at the bottom of a set of generic cement stairs. It looks like the back entrance to a rundown mall.

But inside is a 9,000-square-foot warehouse where, just a stone’s throw from the front door, you’ll find one of the most interesting robots in the world.

Daisy is actually a series of five robot arms working in an elaborate dance.

James Martin/CNET

Meet Daisy. Daisy is 33 feet long, has five arms and can methodically deconstruct any of 15 iPhone models — from 2012’s iPhone 5 to 2018’s iPhone XS — at a rate of 200 per hour. In a coordinated and sometimes violent dance, Daisy removes the screen, battery, screws, sensors, logic board and wireless charging coil, leaving its husk of an aluminum shell.

Apple invited me here not just to see Daisy in action, but also the Material Recovery Lab that’s been built up around it. Last year, Apple