GOP Congressman Refiles Marijuana Research Bill With Important Changes

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Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) tossed her hat in the 2020 presidential ring on Tuesday, announcing that she’s forming an exploratory committee.

The senator, who has an A grade from NORML, has become one of the most vocal advocates for federal marijuana reform in Congress, co-sponsoring multiple pieces of legislation and frequently talking about the issue in speeches and on social media.

Legislation And Policy Actions

While Gillibrand did not co-sponsor any cannabis-related bills during her time in the House, she’s signed her name onto several notable Senate bills in recent years. That includes the Marijuana Justice Act, which would remove marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act and punish states that enforce cannabis laws disproportionately against people of color.

She also co-sponsored legislation designed to protect medical marijuana states from federal interference, make it easier to conduct research on cannabis and legalize industrial hemp. Another research-related bill she co-sponsored would encourage the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to study how marijuana can treat specific conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder.

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During testimony at a Senate Judiciary Sub-Committee hearing in 2016, Gillibrand said that “I know some people are saying that we should wait until there’s more research before changing the laws, but the one thing blocking the research is the law.”

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In April 2018, Gillibrand sent a letter to then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions, requesting that he attend a meeting with some of her constituents who’ve been arrested for non-violent marijuana offenses.

“It is an American principle that, no matter the law, it should be applied equally to all people, regardless of their race or background,” she wrote. “Sadly, as you will hear from my constituents, for decades, the so-called ‘War on Drugs’ has not been pursued with equality.”

She also joined a bipartisan coalition of lawmakers who sent a letter to Sessions, imploring him to update them on the status of applications to cultivate cannabis for federal research purposes.

Quotes And Social Media Posts

For the last five years, Gillibrand has made Twitter a central platform for her marijuana reform advocacy.

But while she initially focused on medical cannabis, her views on the issue evolved and so did the tweets on her feed.

Gillibrand has routinely railed against the pharmaceutical industry, which she criticized for opposing cannabis legalization.

“To them, it’s competition for chronic pain, and that’s outrageous because we don’t have the crisis in people who take marijuana for chronic pain having overdose issues,” the senator said. “It’s not the same thing. It’s not as highly addictive as opioids are.”

She also criticized Sessions for rescinding Obama-era guidance that directed prosecutors to generally not interfere with state marijuana laws.

“Millions of Americans’ lives have been devastated because of our broken marijuana policies, especially in communities of color and low-income communities,” Gillibrand said in a press release. “Just one minor possession conviction could take away a lifetime of opportunities for jobs, education, and housing, tear families apart, and make people more vulnerable to serving time in jail or prison down the road.”

“The reality that my 14-year-old son would likely be treated very differently from one of his Black or Latino peers if he was caught with marijuana is shameful. Legalizing marijuana is a social justice issue and a moral issue that Congress needs to address to help fix decades of injustice caused by our nation’s failed drug policies.”

Beyond Capitol Hill, Gillibrand has worked to build support for legislation to legalize marijuana in her home state of New York. He office has issued numerous press releases about cannabis policy in recent years.

Personal Experience With Marijuana

Gillibrand doesn’t appear to have publicly discussed whether she has ever consumed marijuana, but she has repeatedly cited conversations with families and patients who’ve benefited from medical cannabis as a motivating factor behind her reform advocacy.

Marijuana Under A Gillibrand Presidency

It stands to reason that the senator would prioritize federal marijuana reform as president, especially in light of her co-sponsorship of the Marijuana Justice Act and the extent to which she has focused on the issue in public statements. It seems likely that she would continue that record if elected to the Oval Office.

Where Presidential Candidate Julián Castro Stands On Marijuana

Photo element courtesy of Gillibrand 2010

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